Butchering a large animal– Tool Bleg

So, I was able to get ahold of a large case of pork necks.  Skin’s already gone, but otherwise most of the pieces look to be the complete neck.  Since they’re for the dogs, I need to break them down into smaller pieces, especially for Arty.  I’m thinking a hacksaw, but is there anything else that might work better?  Money is, as usual, an issue, but since I expect to be able to source pork necks and other similer pieces from this supplier on a regular basis getting something that’ll DO the job is worth it.  Any suggestions from you hunter/farmer people?

6 Comments

  1. Ping from Mrs. S.:

    If you are going to be butchering a lot, it might be wise to invest in a bone saw. It is slightly larger and longer than a hacksaw. The longer stroke will be a big help.

    • Ping from Ruth:

      In theory, at least, I will be able to get pork necks and possibly other such pieces from this place regularly (though the 30lb case of pork necks I got yesterday will last us a few weeks anyway). I was vaugly thinking “bone saw” but hadn’t gotten there yet. The cheapy hacksaw did the job this afternoon, at least till my hands gave out, but we’ll be looking at a bone saw right quick I think.

  2. Ping from helene:

    Talk to your local butcher for some ideas. We’ve been known to use long handled branch loppers on deer.

  3. Ping from JC:

    Commercial butchers use bandsaws just like the one you have in your garage…or maybe don’t. They have the advantage of moving the blade in one direction, pulling bone dust out of the kerf (that’s the slot in the material left by the passage of the blade). Personally, I’m thinking sawzall – the generic term for reciprocating power saws, with maybe a 10 tooth pper inch blade long enough to get through the tough part, then maybe finish up with a cleaver or major chef’s knife. Your problem is going to be the blade – wost are sold painted (helps tell which is the fresh one when you have some 2 dozen of ’em in the bottom of your saw case, but some are sold with just an oil coating to prevent rust. Thaat wipes off with an alcohol prep pad, or as we call it, a rag.

    • Ping from Ruth:

      Power saws of various types are on the list of tools we need…otherwise yah, a band saw would have totally solved the problem. Thanks for hte heads up on the blades….